How To Market Your Book With Youtube — Part 10

New Year – new lockdown! With just 4 weeks to go – our book marketing plans are dealt a blow thanks to the Pandemic – how will I keep my latest book launch on track?

The 10th outing in this series – following the book marketing journey of Mark’s newest book ‘The Crow Folk’ – the video is rammed full of book marketing strategies and tips for authors, as well as writing advice and all sorts of book promotion insights.

This series takes you on a journey of book publishing – offering writing tips and writing advice – along with book promotion and book marketing strategies. It’s the uncut, inside story of a book’s journey from the page to it appearing on a bookshelf in your favourite bookstore …

Video Tools We Use & Recommend: Full disclosure – This is an affiliate link – but you’ll be able to purchase these tools at the same rate as anywhere else. All this means is we get a small amount of cash for introducing you to these fine products, and that is invested back into producing more content, to help you. YouTube Channel Optimisation: VidIQ : https://vidiq.com?afmc=7j0 Editing: Camtasia : https://techsmith.z6rjha.net/bLdo6 ScreenFlow: Telestream : https://telestream.8bx6ag.net/6vmYb Captions: Subly : https://getsubly.com/ Rev : https://rev.com/ Temi : https://temi.com/ We are ALL about HELPING business owners, entrepreneurs and marketers get the MOST from VIDEO and DIGITAL MARKETING. Our mission is to share our marketing knowledge and our 20+ years in broadcast TV to harness the AWESOME power of video to HELP all our BUSINESSES GROW.

Where Can You Buy Books During The UK Lockdown?

My book The Crow Folk is out on 4th February. How can you buy it and support indie bookstores?

Here are some links…

Coles Books for a signed copy and signed exclusive art print

Waterstones

Book Depository for free world wide P&P

Support your local bookshop at The Hive and Bookshop.org

Blackwells

Wordery

WH Smith

Oh, all right then… Amazon

TRANSCRIPT:

Hello folks, Mark, Stay here. It’s January 6th and the UK has gone into lockdown for the third time, third time’s a charm and that means all bookshops are closed. So if you want to buy books… In particular, if you’re going to buy this book. Where can you go? Now, uh…

All sorts of options. All sorts of options. Number one, I would suggest you go to Coles Bookshop in Bicester because they’re selling signed copies of the book with a free signed art print, signed by myself and the artist Harry Goldhawk. Look at that. Marvellous. Look at it. Ooh. That’s port of call number one.

If you’re a if you’re a Waterstones fan or if you never used Waterstones before, try them because they have a wonderful thing. Every time you buy – spend ten pounds – you get a stamp and if you buy books as much as I do, then in no time at all. You get a free book or ten pounds credit. Fantastic. So get it from Waterstones.

If you live overseas, well, The best place… When I say overseas, outside the UK, obviously go to The Book Depository. They have free postage and packing worldwide, which is a wonderful thing. And very often you get free bookmark. Not my bookmark, but you know, a bookmark. Just get it for the bookmark.
And then apparently there’s some online start up called Ammaz? Amzz? It’ll come to me… Anyway you can… Look it up online. Just Google it.
But, yeah, if you’re working in a bookshop, and they’re on furlough now and, you know, help them support them as much as you can. We’re going to need them more than ever.

We interrupt this video to bring you an update on behalf of UK bookshops.
Many still operate on a click and collect or mail order basis during lockdown.
And we’ll be able to get you all the books you can eat.
Also, check the Hive and UK.Bookshop.org, an easy way to shop online and support local bookshops.
You’ll find links to these below.
Now back to your regular broadcast from somewhere in Kent

So yeah. I put some links for all this gubbins below.
Where you can get not just my book…
They do all sorts of books, but yes, support your local bookshops.
And, you know, if you can’t get out much, use Amazon.
I know it’s fashionable to hate them, but, you know, if you are housebound or whatever, they’re bloody good at what they do.
So, yes, anyway,
Oh here we go…
Out of the woods.
It’s a metaphor for something, innit
What a wonderful day to go for a walk.
Happy reading. See you again soon.

Book Cover Illustration With Harry Goldhawk

Artist and illustrator Harry Goldhawk tells me how a book cover goes from a few words on a brief, through different rough concepts, to a final finished book cover.

You can pre-order The Crow Folk and get a free art print signed by myself and Harry here.

You can buy Harry’s art at: https://www.papiopress.co.uk

TRANSCRIPT:

Hello, folks, Book covers, let’s talk about book covers. If you’ve ever wondered how a book cover comes about, the process of it, all the ins and outs, how it goes from just a few words in a brief to something like this… Ooh! This is the video for you. I’m going to be talking to Harry Goldhawk, the artist who did the front cover for my book, The Crow Folk, about the process that he goes through. Absolutely fascinating stuff. But before that, I want to say a big thank you to anyone who’s watched these videos, liked, commented, spread the word, told their friends. Thank you for that. We’re coming to the end of a very strange year. I’m recording this on Christmas Eve Eve, if that’s a thing. And a couple of days after the solstice, the dark days are behind us. There are brighter days ahead. If you’re in the northern hemisphere,that is anyway. So, yes. Thank you and Merry Christmas. A happy and prosperous New Year. But before that, here’s my chat
with Harry Goldhawk.

Harry Goldhawk, How are you, sir.
How are you? How do we find you on this lovely day?

I’m very good, thank you. How are you?

I’m tickety boo. Thank you for asking. What we’re going to do today, We’re going to talk through the whole process from soup to nuts. From the first brief of cover art, through the rough compositions, to the finished artwork. So how does it start for you? I presume you get you get a brief from the designer. Who is Matt Johnson at Simon & Schuster. Is that your first contact?

Yes, my first contact was from Matt Johnson. He sent a brief over to me just with an outline, asked me if I was interested. So I got a synopsis of the book itself, what they would like me to illustrate and whether I was keen, really, along with the timeline, whether I could fit that and the budget.

Excellent stuff. And the synopsis. I mean, how much does that sway you? And I’m not I’m not fishing for compliments here. I’m just wondering what kind of book… because you may think, it’s not my kind of book I might not get this. Does that have any bearing on whether or not you take on a project?

It definitely does sway me. If it’s something along the lines of fantasy and with magical elements. I’m definitely a lot more interested in that. So as soon as I got this through, I was very keen. I mean, as you can see from all the roughs that I’ve done, I just wanted to make sure I explored all the options. So I was I was very excited about the project overall. Yeah, wonderful.

And what’s the first… Once you’ve got this brief, which I presume is essentially is it a one page document? So you’ve got that synopsis. You’ve got an idea of who the lead character is and some of the situations in the story. What’s your process and do you start sketching ideas immediately?

I’m not really one for sketching. My tutors hated it at college, but I, I definitely do struggle with sketching ideas down. Initially, I start writing. I write down the themes, I write down the elements that I think I think of the colours that I might use. And then I usually start with a few thumbnails, just rough compositions that kind of thing. And then I have a bad habit of jumping straight into final artwork because it’s quite nice for things to look polished. It’s a terrible habit and one I’m working on, as you can see from the roughs that they are a little finalized, but I just enjoy seeing a final product.

Let’s, uh, let’s have a look at these “roughs”, let’s put that in air quotes, because brace yourself, viewers, because these are these are anything but rough. And so let’s let’s just bring up the first one here. So and this, as you can see, very, very different to the well, the colour the colours are there, aren’t they? But we’re seeing Faye’s face here. We’ve got the moon in her glasses, there where her eyes would be. Where did where did this come from and how long would something like that take you to put together?

So this was the the initial brief. The initial brief was to illustrate the outline of a girl say, and within that silhouette of the illustration of rural Kent. So, rolling hills, the woods, possibly the Scarecrow and the Spitfires and then the the other note that they added was that they wanted it, at first glance, to appear normal. And, although that magic is a theme throughout the book, to not show anything physically magical and to instead convey that feeling of magic through the colours or another way. So for me, that feeling of golden hour, the hour where the sun is setting or rising is such a magical time of the day. And that is something that I was trying to capture in this. Just that gorgeous light. And in terms of the timeline. I’m not sure. A few hours, I would say.

Wow, that is just amazing. OK, well that’s that’s that’s terrific. So that was your first “rough”. And then with that with this and the colours. What was interesting is the colours have stayed all the way through. So this is a slightly updated rough version where we see more birds around the edges here.

Yes. That was the one that was presented at the final cover meeting. So before that, the notes were maybe remove some of the stars from the outside and switch them with crows, which aesthetically I thought was a very good note. That helped definitely. But once they presented the at the meeting, it was deemed too Young as it’s a book for adults, which at the time I was a little disappointed with, but I was ecstatic to be given another shot with it. And Matt came back to me and just said, it’s the silhouette that’s making it look a bit too young. So how about we scrap the silhouette, make the illustration full bleed, and bring it out edge-to-edge and we’ll see how that looks instead.

There are some other ideas here, which I’m going to I’m going to run through. I’d like to know where they came in the process as well.

Yeah, sure.

We’ve got this version here, which is which shows sort of a full length illustration of Faye with a crow.

Was that something you worked with before you showed it to Simon & Schuster or is that something that came out of conversations that you had with them?

No, no, no conversations. So bear in mind, I hadn’t read the book, so I was just going by the the synopsis that I had. I did at the same time that I did the profile of Faye’s face. And I just wanted to make sure it explored a few of the different silhouettes that we could do. But as you can see, with a full body silhouette, there’s only so much detail you can fit within it. It is sort of lost a bit, which is why I don’t think any of those got used.

And this… There’s another one here. Let me bring this up. You say you’ve not read the book, but there is a scene in the book almost exactly like this, which is just uncanny. And again, you’ve got the placing of the…

Really?! I was guessing

Crescent moon right where her heart is as well. So, again, that’s just that’s just uncanny. But this idea. That the silhouette, that the character made it too young, is that something you find helps make a distinction between adult and children’s novels because adult novels tend to be more design led, whereas children’s novels, you tend to like to see the characters on the cover, don’t you?

Is that…?

Yeah, they are they generally are a bit more character-led. Yeah. I mean, in honesty, I haven’t illustrated too many adult novels so as an area I’m looking to to do more of these.

Okay. And then we come to… Very, very close to the actual final image. Now this is… I don’t think I saw this version. I think I saw the version afterwards. But yeah. To talk us through this one.

Yes. So that was what I worked on immediately after getting the feedback to make it full bleed edge-to-edge. I was just thinking of alternative ways, you know, alternative ways of presenting it, essentially. And I felt like the creepy woods needed to be a bigger part of it. So to make that frame the illustration, rather than being in the middle distance at this point, this is my bad habit of things being finalized. So I sent this over to Matt, just to get his opinion of it before I took it any further and I said I think it needs something like a focal point, like a village or something else in the centre there, let me know what you think about that. And he responded. He showed it to his editor and they agreed, but they gave me the green light to go ahead and take that final.

This is almost final. But you’ve got a couple of things. And this is this is the version that I was first shown which was blew me away, which I absolutely loved. There’s a little bicycle highlighted down there because I said, wouldn’t it be great if we had Faye on her bicycle cycling either away or towards the village, which looks amazing. Also up here, we’ve got… Well, would you like to explain yourself, Harry? What’s going on here with this buttock?

Yes, that was something that I just didn’t see whilst I was drawing it. And when I read the note, I thought, what are you talking about? And then I came back to it and I showed my wife as well. And we were just howling because it does it does look very bum-like.

Well, we could talk about, the psychological factors behind this for hours, I suspect. But we haven’t got that much time. But yeah, that’s amazing. And what’s this little tick over here? We lost a crow on the left hand side as well.

No, I think there was a… Yeah, I think there was a crow there, which they removed and asked me to remove. So that was the third final tweak. So, yeah, that was a relatively easy tweak to make. Yeah.

Hi, folks. Just a quick note to say that if you’re loving Harry’s art as much as I am, you can get a signed print of The Crow Folk cover art just like this one signed by me in the top left hand corner and Harry signing it in the bottom there. When you preorder the book from Cole’s Books, there are only 200 of these signed by myself and Harry and they’re exclusive to Coles. I’ll pop a link in the description. Get yours while stocks last. Back to the show.

Let’s cut to the actual finished final cover art here and see what that looks like, because it has to has to roll over the spine. So this is the finished article. And folks, you can see the village there, which gives it that focal point. You can see Faye on her bicycle. So, yeah. And the framing. It’s only when you see it in that context that you see the framing and the way the wood kind of moves in from the edges. It’s just wonderful. And I’ve got to tell you, I guarantee this… I’ve had so many comments from people on the cover art. This is what’s selling the book. This is what’s making such a difference. I did hear that a certain high street retailer doubled their order after seeing the cover art.

Harry, I do owe you a drink at some point at least a drink or at least a lunch or something. So I…

I’ll have to take you up on that offer.

When the world gets back on its feet. But that’s amazing. How long did the process take from that first brief to to this
here? From start to finish.

So yeah, I designed this all on my iPad with an iPad Pro with the Apple pencil. And the app that I use tracks my time that I use. I checked the other night and in total it was around about thirty hours from start to finish.

And of course you’ll be working all sorts of–

Yeah, I’m not sure if that’s too much or too–

I mean I was going to say, is that kind of the average or is that, is that kind of, you know… Like you say you like to, you like to, to make stuff look finished, even your roughs look really, really finished. So I suspect you’re putting a lot of time in there, aren’t you?

I do.I do like to put a lot of time into it. Yeah. It depends on what kind of illustrator you are. I’m sure there are plenty of amazing illustrators that could do it in less time, but I definitely like to take my time with my illustrations.

Well, I for one am very, very grateful for it. What software are you using? So you’re doing this on an iPad? You’re using an Apple pencil. What’s the software that you’re using to create this?

An amazing piece of software called Procreate. It’s made by an amazing group in Australia who regularly update it its a serious competitor for Photoshop. At the moment, I think it is one of the most popular pieces of software for iPad users.

Wonderful. And if you’re talking, if you’re saying it’s like Photoshop, are you working in layers to allow you to add things in layers and compare before and after and that sort of thing?

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It does work in layers, so there’s quite a few in this one and you can group all the layers together. So from a convenience perspective, it’s fantastic, really. It’s very convenient. And also having… Being at home with a toddler, it means I can draw I don’t just have to be at my desk, I can be anywhere.

That’s fantastic. What other stuff are you…? Because I’ve we just got our Christmas Radio Times and I’m looking at the Christmas Radio Times and there are banners across the top. I’m thinking that’s a familiar looking style. You’re doing the banners for the Christmas Radio Times! How did that come about?

That came about through my amazing agent, the Artworks. There are a few different illustrators that are also signed by the Artworks that did a few of the illustrations within this year’s Radio Times. So I was just… I’m just very fortunate to be represented by them and have them championing my artwork.

I mean, for me, that’s that must be that feels like an incredible honour. That’s that’s like up there with an exhibition at the National Gallery or something that is part of that as part of a British institution, isn’t it? You know, I think listeners outside of the UK might not understand this, but it’s fantastic. Huge. Congratulations on that. I’m telling everyone I know, you know, it’s so… I’m so delighted. Okay, so that’s cool. I’ve got two more books in this series. Could you kindly come back and do the other two as well, please? Harry, please. Please.

I think I might be able to squeeze them in.

Yeah, very much. Thank you very, very much.

And the other thing is you also you do all kinds of…

I’d be delighted.

Oh, thank you. You do all kinds of artwork that we can buy online. You even do hats. I got one of your hats for my daughter for her birthday, and she’s absolutely delighted with it. She wears it all the time, even indoors. Where can we where can we find all this stuff, Harry? Where can we track you down?

So I run a lifestyle brand with my wife called Papio Press. So we sell a lot of stationery and other illustrated goods, hats and art prints. And you can find that all on PapioPress.co.uk. So that’s PapioPress.co.uk.

Wonderful stuff, folks. I’ll put a link in the description below so you can find that nice and easily. And if you’re looking for a unique gift, absolutely gorgeous. Wonderful stuff. Harry, thank you so much for this. This has been it’s been absolutely fascinating because it’s… Speaking as someone who managed to fail A-level Art… I’m always fascinated by the the artistic process, particularly with new technology in the way it works and that sort of thing. So thank you for your amazing artwork. Like I said, it really has made all the difference to the book, and I think will continue to do so.

And I’m delighted to if you can come back for books two and three, maybe we can talk about those then.

That sounds amazing. I would love to come back for more. I really would. I was ecstatic to draw this cover. And I was so pleased when you mentioned that you signed on for two more books. So I’m excited to see how they turn up.

Thank you so much, Harry, and speak to you again soon.
So cool.
Thank you very much Mark, take care.

Get a FREE signed art print when you pre-order The Crow Folk

The splendid folk at Coles Books are offering a FREE art print, signed by myself and cover artist Harry Goldhawk, when you pre-order the paperback of THE CROW FOLK from them.

I’ll also be signing bookplates, so the books will be signed too!

This is completely exclusive to Coles Books and they ship worldwide, so get in fast (there are only 200 of these!) and pre-order here!

How To Market Your Book On YouTube — Episode 6

Are you a debut author or seasoned writer needing to know HOW to market your book? Or HOW to promote your book on YouTube?

In this in deep-dive, they talk candidly about WHICH video marketing strategies have worked, and which have not been as successful. WILL they hit their 1000 target for pre-sales before Feb 2021? WHICH digital marketing techniques will they enlist? WHICH book marketing strategy will be put to the test next on their ambitious (some may say foolhardy) quest?

In Episode 6 you will learn:

The definition of a blurb and how a few words on your book cover can make all the difference.

How to run a blog tour (or get someone to organise it for you).

Why categorisation is important, but ultimately it’s the reader who decides.

The kind of pre-publication publicity that a publisher can organise for you, including features in trade magazines like The Bookseller, and interviews in store magazines like Booktime.

Why an author should be a “squeaky wheel”!

And we take a look at other AuthorTubers and why they are so successful.

Do please enjoy…

I’ve Been Tweaking My Blurb

Blurbs are hard and I’ve been tweaking mine (ooh, Matron!)…

Transcript:

Hello folks, Mark Stay here. I’m sure you’ll be delighted to learn, I’ve been tweaking my blurb. Ooh, Matron. What does that mean? Well, the blurb is the book description. It’s that three paragraphs that you see on the back of the paperback or on the online retailers’ book description. And it’s one of the most powerful selling tools you have, because it’s usually the first thing that people see, and it helps them make up their mind if they actually want to read on and buy the book, and what have you. So, I got some feedback from Simon and Schuster’s sales department. They felt the blurb was reading a little bit too young… skewing a little bit too young. Let me just read it out to you to give you an idea. So here’s the blurb as was, and then I’ll talk about how I’ve tweaked it and how it’s changed.

So here’s the original blurb: As Spitfires roar overhead, and a dark figure stalks the village of Woodville, a young woman will discover her destiny. Faye bright always felt a little bit different. And today she’s found out why. She’s just stumbled across her late mother’s diary, which includes not only a spiffing recipe for jam roly poly, but spells incantations, runes and recitations… a witch’s notebook and Faye has inherited her mother’s abilities. Just in time too… the Crow Folk are coming. Led by the charismatic Pumpkinhead, their strange magic threatens Faye and the villagers. Armed with little more than her mum’s words, her trusty bicycle, the grudging help of two bickering, old ladies and some aggressive church bell ringing, Faye will find herself on the front lines of a war nobody expected. Now, the things that jump out there are references to jam roly, poly, which is in the book, and the word spiffing.

I felt they may be felt a little bit too Famous Five. This all sort of begs the question: who is this book for? You know: do you want it read by a YA market or middle grade market? And let’s define what they are: middle grade is kind of up to about… Sort of from about eight to about 12 years old. YA is anywhere from mid teens, right up to mid thirties. Actually that older, mid thirties market I think would really, really enjoy this, but you don’t want to put off a whole corner of the market that might read that and think, Oh, that’s a bit young for me. It’s a bit childish, perhaps. I mean, this book doesn’t have any swearing, because of the period really, uh, there’s, there’s no violence. Certainly not as violent as my previous books.

There’s no sex. So it could genuinely be read by anyone from the age of 10 upwards. But, it does deal with the second world war. There are demonic forces at work here. So, you know, you don’t want to put people off, but you want to sort of capture the tone of the book. So I went back and forth with my publisher on this. We removed those words like spiffing, words, like jam roly poly, and tried to make it just a little bit darker. We went a bit too far with some of our efforts, but then we dialed it back a bit. So, here’s what we got. So, uh, this is the new blurb: War rages in Europe, but in a quiet village in rural Kent, there is another battle to be won. Faye Bright has always known she was different, but when she discovers her late mother’s diary, she realizes why. It’s full of spells incantation, runes, and recitations.

It is a witch’s notebook and Faye has inherited her mother’s abilities. Just in time too. The Crow folk are coming. And they want that book. Led by the charismatic pumpkinhead, their strange magic threatens Faye and the villagers. Armed with little more than her mum’s words, the grudging help of two bickering witches, and some aggressive church bellringing, Faye will find herself on the front lines of a war with demonic forces. So you see, there are slight differences. You know, we got rid of jam roly poly, spiffing. We’ve got demonic forces in there, so it’s darker, but not too dark. And hopefully this will have that kind of crossover appeal. What’s really helped in the last week or so is I’ve started getting quotes from other authors, which is just amazing. So we’ve got a quote from Rowan Coleman. Thank you, Rowan.

This is amazing. She says it’s full of magic and delight, and we’ve put that on the front cover. And Julie Wassmer, has said it’s warm, witty, witchy, wartime fun, which again adds the fun element to it. So we don’t have to put that in the blurb. So you’ve got those two things working together. You’ve got the kind of the darkness of the blurb, but reassuring voices, other authors saying: you know what, it’s fun as well. So, yeah, we’ve also put a little shout line on the cover as well, which is: June, 1940 rationing blackouts, witchcraft. Which again, you know, combines all the, all those elements of the story. Blurbs are hard. They’re really, really hard. I mean, we’ve, uh, we’ve gone back and forth on this for months and they’re never kind of set in stone either. They’re things that evolve over time. Certainly my robot overlords blurb, has been updated recently with references to quarantine… Rather than being stuck inside. You know, you are in quarantine, lockdown, they’re using words that are very topical. That just happened. I didn’t have anything to do with that, but I think it’s very smart on the part of Gollancz to do that. So yes, blurbs: ever-evolving, ever-changing. I hope you’ve enjoyed this, hope you find it useful and, uh, speak to you again soon. Bye.

How To Market Your Book On YouTube – Episode 5

Are you a debut author or seasoned writer needing to know HOW to market your book? Or HOW to promote your book on YouTube?

In this 5th episode author Mark Stay and video marketer Jeremy Mason reveal more book marketing strategies and tips for authors.

WHICH of their video marketing strategies have worked so far? WILL they hit their 1000 target for pre-sales before Feb 2021? WHICH digital marketing techniques will they enlist? WHICH book marketing strategy will be put to the test next on their ambitious (some may say foolhardy) quest?

In Episode 5 you will learn: Lots of book marketing strategies, finding the route to market for your book, insider hints and tips that will help you with marketing your book. We talk about: Tweetdeck, Canva, Goodreads, BookFunnel, Groovepages, book events, pre-orders, book signings, pitching yourself for publicity and more…

A Recipe for Jam Roly Poly

As you may know, at the start of my forthcoming book The Crow Folk our young heroine Faye Bright finds a book left to her by her late mother. In this book are spells, recipes, incantations… and a recipe for Jam Roly Poly (translation for non-British folk: Jam Roly Poly is a much-loved pudding that has the same density as a sock stuffed with pastry, but filled with jam and tastes lovely with custard).

I am delighted to announce that the recipe featuring rationed ingredients from 1940 is finally available for lovely subscribers to my newsletter. It was compiled by Miss Burgess, a baker of some repute in the village. 

You’re NOT a subscriber to my newsletter?? Then sign up now and grab your free recipe and a sample of the first few chapters of the book here.

And you can watch the delectable Miss Burgess try both the 1940 and modern recipes here…

YumTube!

People are saying Lovely Things about The Crow Folk

People are starting to say lovely things about THE CROW FOLK!

It’s available to pre-order in paperback, eBook and audio. It’s on NetGalley now, or you can have an exclusive peek at the opening here: https://witchesofwoodville.com/#library

I can’t tell you how terrifying it is to be compared to Terry Pratchett and Diana Wynne Jones! I get the Worzel Gummidge comparison — a big influence on this book in particular.

How To Market Your Book On YouTube – Episode 4

Ever wondered HOW to market your book? Or HOW to promote your book on YouTube? Join the 4th outing of author & screenwriter Mark Stay and video creator & marketer Jeremy Mason, as they implement a video book marketing plan for Mark’s upcoming release.

One month in – have ANY of their video marketing strategies worked? WILL they hit their 1000 target for pre-sales before Feb 2021? Time is marching on. WHICH video marketing techniques will they enlist? WHICH YouTube book marketing strategy will be put to the test next on their ambitious (some may say foolhardy) quest? In Episode 4 you will learn about YouTube Channel Optimisation, VidIQ, Tube Buddy, Captions, rev.com and Subly.

You can watch us waffle here…